Event Title

SESSION 2: WeWork

Location

Zoom Recording Available at Link Below.

Event Website

https://media.law.seattleu.edu/Playlist/c2G6Rpd7?destinationID=4AUx5RIOEkqKZ8DZ1XLNHw&contentID=uY9QYlwPWkmG-WEuEqr1VQ&orderBy=videoTitle&orderByDirection=asc&pageIndex=1&pageSize=10

Start Date

13-6-2020 10:30 AM

End Date

13-6-2020 11:30 AM

Description

ABSTRACT: When Worlds Collide: How an 86-Year Old Federal Law (The Securities Act of 1933) Exposed the Flaws in WeWork’s “Innovative Business Model.”

Co-working pioneer WeWork, a wholly owned subsidiary of The We Company, grew meteorically through an extremely aggressive building and master-lease acquisition strategy over the past several years. Substantial, early stage funding from SoftBank, a Japan-based high-tech venture capital investment bank, reinforced WeWork’s unicorn status. But was WeWork’s business model truly unique, bringing with it the promise of a very profitable real estate operating company in the future? Or was it the company’s early stage, venture capital-fueled meteoric growth—without a solid business plan for how that growth and market dominance might translate to a financially stable and profitable operating entity over the long run— that made it the shiny red firetruck in the toy store window that attracted investor attention?

Comments

Special Topic Introduction: Peter Smirniotopoulos

Featured Speaker: Ryan Mathisen, J.D., Summa Cum Laude Seattle University School of Law ‘19 & Judicial Law Clerk (Aug. 2019 – June 2020) Washington State Supreme Court “What the We Company’s Initial Public Offering for its We Work Subsidiary Revealed About the Challenges of the Co-Working Sector in Commercial Real Estate”

Panel Discussion: Ryan Mathisen, Featured Speaker & Moderator Peter Smirniotopoulos Paul Swegle, Adjunct Professor, Seattle University School of Law; General Counsel, Observa (and other start-ups); Author, Startup Law and Fundraising

Session 2 Introduction.pdf (259 kB)
by Prof. Peter Smirniotopoulos

Session 2 Summary.pdf (239 kB)
Summary of Proceeding by Jeffrey Thomson

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Jun 13th, 10:30 AM Jun 13th, 11:30 AM

SESSION 2: WeWork

Zoom Recording Available at Link Below.

ABSTRACT: When Worlds Collide: How an 86-Year Old Federal Law (The Securities Act of 1933) Exposed the Flaws in WeWork’s “Innovative Business Model.”

Co-working pioneer WeWork, a wholly owned subsidiary of The We Company, grew meteorically through an extremely aggressive building and master-lease acquisition strategy over the past several years. Substantial, early stage funding from SoftBank, a Japan-based high-tech venture capital investment bank, reinforced WeWork’s unicorn status. But was WeWork’s business model truly unique, bringing with it the promise of a very profitable real estate operating company in the future? Or was it the company’s early stage, venture capital-fueled meteoric growth—without a solid business plan for how that growth and market dominance might translate to a financially stable and profitable operating entity over the long run— that made it the shiny red firetruck in the toy store window that attracted investor attention?

https://digitalcommons.law.seattleu.edu/sitie_symposium/itbe2020/june13/4